City on Fire

City on Fire

Williams, Walter Jon

Book 2.0 of Metropolitan

language: English

Publisher: Baen Books

Publishing date: Jan 1, 1997

Words: 184768
Pages: 796

Description:

Nominated for both the Hugo and Nebula Award, *City on Fire *returns to the world-city of *Metropolitan,* a city dominated by plasm, the magical substance capable of both creation and destruction. With her help, Aiah's lover Constantine has established himself in the metropolis of Caraqui, a nation dominated by corrupt officials, gangsters, and the genetically altered known as the "twisted." Here they hope to create a revolution in the cosmic order--- but first they must fend off treachery, war, and the threat of Taikoen, the "hanged man," a deadly creature that lives within plasm itself. Aiah must fight not only for her revolution and for her place in the world, but for Constantine's very soul. "*City on Fire* is a splendid, riveting novel in which the most powerful magic is that of a writer directing the twin streams of reason and intuition to produce a dream within the texture of reality." ---Russell Letson, Locus, April 1997 "*City on Fire*, by Walter Jon Williams, is that rarest of entertainments, a sequel that improves on a successful predecessor . . . Mr. Williams' prose is distinguished by a no-nonsense confidence that perfectly matches Constantine's unshakable faith in his own destiny and in his ability to resist the corruption that notoriously comes with power." ---Gerald Jonas, *NY Times Book Review,* Feb 23, 1997 "*City on Fire* offers something for just about every kind of reader . . . Williams really gives the reader hours of entertainment with polished style, twisty plots, action and vivid characters." ---Jeff Watkins "Williams [creates] a magnificent world-city, its entire surface urbanized by a multitude of civilizations that draw their very existence from plasm, the mysterious energy contained in all matter . . . Well-drawn, believable characters give emotional force to this fine novel . . . Ultimately, however, it is Williams's complex world-city, more convincing than even Asimov in *Foundation*, and his endlessly inventive use of plasm that will hold readers' fascinated attention. ---Publishers Weekly, Dec 30, 1996.